In this month’s Coloring Corner on page 14, architect Edgar Lopez illustrates Downtown El Paso, a section that’s known to be home to numerous buildings designed by iconic American architect Henry C. Trost. Last year, Lopez teamed up with the Texas Trost Society to create a 76-page coloring book that commemorates Trost buildings. What you see on page 14 is just one illustration from the book.

Sponsored by DeadBeach Brewery, What’s Up and the Texas Trost Society will host an adult coloring book night on Thursday, Nov. 30 at the brewery as part of the increasingly popular Last Thursdays Art Walk. Attendees can color more pages from the book, which will also be for sale at the event.

Those curious to learn more about the Texas Trost Society can take a bike tour of the Trost mansions along the Montana Avenue Historic District. The tour, which is on Sunday, Nov. 12, will include breakfast at the new Five Points eatery Salt + Honey. You can learn more about the fundraising event at facebook.com/TexasTrostSociety.

A nonprofit organization, the Texas Trost Society started in 2013 after a concern over the loss of buildings designed by the cherished architect.

“I got in touch with the El Paso County Historical Commission and found out that a really gorgeous Victorian building had caught fire,” Texas Trost Society executive director Malissa Arras-Grossman said. “What I was really struck by was that nobody was really paying attention to it. My grandparents live in Boston, and the historic patrimony is such a integral part of the city’s economy. If a historic building gets demolished, it’s a big deal.”

The goal of the Trost Society is to reduce apathy over El Paso’s rich Mexican-American history and architecture through educational outreach and fun tours. The organization also aims to promote heritage tourism as an economic booster.

“More people are visiting places not just because they have cool theme parks or good restaurants, but because of the character of that place,” Arras-Grossman explained. “New Orleans survives off of heritage tourism. Tourists spend money on museums, going on tours, going to fancy restaurants and staying in nicer, historic hotels.”

The Trost Society envisions a similar future for El Paso.

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